All posts by gvmeco

Rest of GVM Evacuated

I just received an email from Larimer County that ALL remaining residents of Glacier View Meadows must evacuate. This includes Gates 1-8, including roads north of hwy 74E. Due to increased winds causing several spot fires,  612 notifications were sent out at 3:15pm. Please be safe everyone.

GVM Community Meeting

Day 12. On June 20, 2012 7pm ~200+ residents of Glacier View Meadows and surrounding communities were updated by the Larimer County Sheriff, our Fire Chief, US Forest Service fire managers and the Red Cross. Using the latest fire map, strategic operations were discussed emphasizing the north and west flanks. It was hoped that the evacuations would be lifted in days not weeks. Today electricity was restored to filings 9-11.

 

GVM Gate 1 Closed

Day 11. This was the view from Gate 1. Smoke plumes were visible behind the Western Ridge Restaurant and National Guard personnel were on patrol. We were informed by the Guardsman that power had been shut off to the restaurant and throughout Filings 9-11 today (6/19/2012) because of another spot fire that jumped the Poudre River at Sheep Mountain, just south of GVM.

 

GVM Under Pre-evac

Day 5. On June 13, 2012 , we saw major smoke plumes and occasional flames which were visible on ridges to the south of the Poudre River. This is looking south at the High Park Fire from Guardian Peak Drive. Our sections of Glacier View Meadows (Filings 9-12) were under a 2-hour pre-evacuation notice.

Mule-deer Nibbled Ponderosa Tips

4/12/2012 Jim E sent this information along with photos, thanks Jim!  “Yesterday I happened to be walking along a game trail here in Glacier View Meadows and spotted a fairly newly wind-thrown ponderosa.  As I’d seen easily accessible branch tips nibbled on along Haystack Rd sometime ago, and didn’t know what did it, this seemed to clinch deer as the cause. The roots are extremely shallow as shown here. The trunk leading off to the left. Here’s the top of the tree showing easily reached – by deer – relatively palatable needles and branch tips.” Jim observed about a dozen piles of deer scat around the tree suggesting that deer are the culprits. He has sent an email to Mark from the Division of Wildlife to ask about mule deer forage habits.

“Finally, this closeup showing a couple plants of wild candytuft (Noccaea [formerly Thlaspi] montana) growing through the pile, which must have been laid before the spring-bloom season.  I’ve Olaus Murie’s 1958 classic, A Field Guide to Animal Tracks, that includes photos of droppings.  They show the winter feeding(or dry diet), and the soft type that results from green or succulent food in summer.  Maybe your folks can tell.”