All posts by integrenz

Update on Collecting Rainwater in GVM

House Bill 16-1005, effective August 10, 2016, allows precipitation to be collected from the rooftop of certain residential properties.

GVM residences that are a single family house on an exempt household-use only well can use rain barrels as allowed under HB16-1005. There is a limit of two rain barrels with a combined storage capacity not to exceed 110 gal. The water must be collected from the roof of the building that is used primarily as the residence and may be used for outdoor uses, such as lawn and garden irrigation, on the property where the water was collected. The water cannot be used for drinking water or indoor household purposes.

Click here for the Rainwater Collection page from the CO Division of Water Resources

Click here for the Best Practices in Residential Rain Barrels from CO Dept of Public Health and Environment

Click here for a Rainbarrel Fact Sheet from CSU

Click here for a Rainwater Collection Information Table from the Colorado Department of Water Resources

 

 

GVM Natural History Report Online

Manhead Mtn Photo
Manhead Mountain in Glacier View Meadows, CO (Photo by Jim Erdman)

In October 2012 Jim Erdman submitted a 26-page report http://mummyrangeinstitute.org/glacier-view-natural-history.pdf  to the Mummy Range Institute which has featured it on their website.  It is a “must read” for those of us who love the ecology, geology and beauty of GVM. Thank you Jim for your lucid writing and beautiful photos! For more information on the important work being done by the Mummy Institute, visit their website http://mummyrangeinstitute.org/.

Rest of GVM Evacuated

I just received an email from Larimer County that ALL remaining residents of Glacier View Meadows must evacuate. This includes Gates 1-8, including roads north of hwy 74E. Due to increased winds causing several spot fires,  612 notifications were sent out at 3:15pm. Please be safe everyone.

GVM Community Meeting

Day 12. On June 20, 2012 7pm ~200+ residents of Glacier View Meadows and surrounding communities were updated by the Larimer County Sheriff, our Fire Chief, US Forest Service fire managers and the Red Cross. Using the latest fire map, strategic operations were discussed emphasizing the north and west flanks. It was hoped that the evacuations would be lifted in days not weeks. Today electricity was restored to filings 9-11.

 

GVM Gate 1 Closed

Day 11. This was the view from Gate 1. Smoke plumes were visible behind the Western Ridge Restaurant and National Guard personnel were on patrol. We were informed by the Guardsman that power had been shut off to the restaurant and throughout Filings 9-11 today (6/19/2012) because of another spot fire that jumped the Poudre River at Sheep Mountain, just south of GVM.

 

GVM Under Pre-evac

Day 5. On June 13, 2012 , we saw major smoke plumes and occasional flames which were visible on ridges to the south of the Poudre River. This is looking south at the High Park Fire from Guardian Peak Drive. Our sections of Glacier View Meadows (Filings 9-12) were under a 2-hour pre-evacuation notice.

Mule-deer Nibbled Ponderosa Tips

4/12/2012 Jim E sent this information along with photos, thanks Jim!  “Yesterday I happened to be walking along a game trail here in Glacier View Meadows and spotted a fairly newly wind-thrown ponderosa.  As I’d seen easily accessible branch tips nibbled on along Haystack Rd sometime ago, and didn’t know what did it, this seemed to clinch deer as the cause. The roots are extremely shallow as shown here. The trunk leading off to the left. Here’s the top of the tree showing easily reached – by deer – relatively palatable needles and branch tips.” Jim observed about a dozen piles of deer scat around the tree suggesting that deer are the culprits. He has sent an email to Mark from the Division of Wildlife to ask about mule deer forage habits.

“Finally, this closeup showing a couple plants of wild candytuft (Noccaea [formerly Thlaspi] montana) growing through the pile, which must have been laid before the spring-bloom season.  I’ve Olaus Murie’s 1958 classic, A Field Guide to Animal Tracks, that includes photos of droppings.  They show the winter feeding(or dry diet), and the soft type that results from green or succulent food in summer.  Maybe your folks can tell.”

Early Bloomers

3/31/2012 From Ellen: On a late morning walk in Filing 10 near our house, I spotted Spring Beauties, Pasque Flowers and Ball Cacti in bloom.

4/8/2012 A week later Jim E. wrote this from his walk on April 7: “Well, Saturday afternoon during my usual amble nearby, I spotted this early-blooming Ball Cactus – but seemingly much earlier than I’m aware.  Photographed ~noon today, these three. This Candytuft is another early bloomer – in the mustard family (Brassicaceae, formerly Cruciferae – note the four ‘cross’ petals).  What a pleasant surprise, the day before Easter.  Why the name ‘candytuft’ I won’t get into – too involved taxonomically. This, a real surprise – Sand Lily; and only one spotted! And in gravelly soil; but what else is there up here in this Sherman Granite?And today’s mid-afternoon saunter along the FS’ Mount Margaret Trail near Red Feather Lakes, a repeat of Pasqueflower (in a controlled burn; note charred fragment).  I reported this in bloom on the FS’ Elkhorn Creek Trail on April 2nd of last year, so this year’s blooms aren’t unusually early. Finally, yes – dandelion, which I don’t even have to show.”